What is level B1.2?

The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR or CEF for short) is a standardized guideline used to describe achievements of learners of foreign languages across Europe and beyond. At Expath's language schools in Berlin, we follow these guidelines in all of our German classes. 

These levels are classified as A1 for beginners, A2 for elementary, B1 for intermediate, B2 for upper intermediate, C1 as advanced, and C2 as mastery. Expath, like many other language schools, splits these levels in half to accommodate students’ time and budget planning (e.g. level A1 is split into A1.1 and A1.2). To start with level A1, you are expected to have no knowledge of German. 

After completing level B1.2, you can:

  • understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.
  • deal with most situations likely to arise while traveling in an area where the language is spoken.
  • produce simple connected text on topics that are familiar or of personal interest and describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.

(Source: Wikipedia)

At Expath, you will learn the following (and more) as part of the B1.2 curriculum:

Talking about games and conditions; Talking about being formal and informal in German; Speaking about people; Reading classified ads; Describing people; Talking about relationships; Offering the “du”; Expressing “seemingly” and “as if” in German; Talking about concurrent actions; Making decisions; Asking for help; Explaining things; Showing understanding; Giving advice; Reacting surprised or critical; Expressing agreement; Expressing disinterest; Asking for help; Commenting; Talking about products; Complaining about products and services; Telling stories; Expressing problems; Describing marketing campaigns; Talking about future actions; Convincing or persuading someone; Refusing apologies; Talking about behavior; Talking about different cultural norms; Acting like a good guest in Germany; Introducing explanations; Evaluating and assessing; Asking for aid; Calming people down; Offering solutions; Speaking with police; Speaking at the lost and found; Talking about rental issues; Analysing pictures and cartoons; Talking about role modelsComparing things; Reading newspaper articles; Talking about political issues in Germany; Asking for opinions; Talking about history; Describing countries; Presenting advantages and disadvantages; Expressing wishes and desires


Sign up today for a B1.2 German course in Berlin!

Email us at info (at) expath.de today and let us know if you have any questions! We're looking forward to seeing you in class!

Check out all upcoming German courses in Berlin Mitte and Neukölln


Have all the info you need to be an expat in Germany?

  • Getting Started & Finding A Flat
  • Childcare in Berlin
  • Freelancing in Germany
  • Getting your Freelance Work Permit
  • Getting Your Freelance Artist visa
  • Finding a Job in Germany
  • How german grammar works

How German Grammar Works

1. Actions with "what"

2. Actions without "what"

3. Can these overlap?

4. What are subjects and objects?

5. How do subjects and objects differ in English?

6. How do subjects and objects look in German?

7. Who loves whom and how genders help

8. Intro to nominative and accusative cases

9. Prepositions and how they tie into all this

10. Summary of everything so far

11. What does the dative case look like?

12. Almost all prepositions and what they trigger

13. How movement and location tie into the cases

14. The difference between movement and location

15. How do you say 'to put' in German?

16. What's allowed in a German sentence?

17. How do adjectives behave in this system?

18. Excellent examples for adjective declension

19. Other articles and how they behave in German

20. A more natural way to get endings right

21. How do reflexive verbs work in German?

22. How verbs with prepositions work fit into this

23. (Briefly) How does the genitive case work?

24. The cases summarized in three simple rules

25. How sentence structure differs from English

26. Questions, commands, statements in German

27. Where everything goes in a German sentence

28. Der, die, and das: Tricks to guess genders better

29. Conclusions

Downloadable Resources:

(PDF) Prepositions and Cases – A handy diagram of German prepositions (with translations) and which case they effect.

(PDF) Prepositions of Movement and Location – An illustration of what kind of movement is expressed with which prepositions and their cases

(PDF) Articles and Adjective Declination – Example sentences to learn in order to get a feeling for the connections, as well as a useful declination table

(PDF) Articles and Adjective Declination – A comprehensive list of articles and which way the following adjectives will end

(PDF) Case Rules – A brief review of what causes which cases

(PDF) Sentence Structure – An illustration of where verbs are located in the different clauses in German


Complete access to this workshop for 90 days

19.99 EUR

Complete access to all workshops for 90 days

119.94 EUR 39.99 EUR

Complete access to all workshops for 180 days 

239.88 EUR 49.99 EUR

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